Posts filed under ‘perpetrated by students or patrons’

Mollat bookstore shenanigan

people-match-books-librairie-mollat-135-58bd718c9396a__700

The Librarie Mollat, a bookstore in Bordeaux, France, has been Instagramming images of their employees and customers with book covers. Some of them are so perfectly matched it seems unreal!

Thanks, Tom McBride and Bored Panda.

March 14, 2017 at 9:30 am Leave a comment

shushing already-quiet people

Um … I’m sorry, everybody. But I had to include this as a library shenanigan. It’s actually like twelve different shenanigans piled together.

Thanks, Marianne Aldrich!

December 16, 2016 at 11:45 am 2 comments

archival shenanigans

spooky

Artist Bill Domonkos uses archival images in the public domain to make seriously spooky animated gifs.

Thanks, Dina Wood!

Happy Halloween, everybody!

October 26, 2016 at 1:42 pm Leave a comment

John Latham’s “Art and Culture”

latham
My colleague Diane Westerfield found a library shenanigan in a scholarly article!

“The Library in Art’s Crosshairs” by Henry Pisciotta. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, v. 35 no. 1, Spring 2016.
“British artist John Latham, while teaching at St. Martin’s School of Art in 1966, checked out a copy of Greenberg’s respected book [Art and Culture] from his school’s library and took it to an evening gathering of friends and students, where the book’s pages were removed and chewed, by a number of participants, and spat into a jar. Later Latham, keenly interested in science, performed a series of chemical transformations on the remains, slowly reducing them to a goo, which he sealed into a glass vial. Overdue notices were received from the library, so Latham eventually attempted to return the book to the librarian in its modified state. This offer was refused. Latham’s teaching contract was not renewed. A few years later, Latham fashioned a carrying case for the vial, some of the lab apparatus, and the library notices, and  today the assemblage is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art.”

The resulting artwork, titled, like the original book, “Art and Culture,” is not currently on view at MoMA, but you can see more information about it here.

October 6, 2016 at 1:52 pm Leave a comment

excellent literary prank (even if it’s fake)

Video made by Generic Theater in Virginia in 2011. As this explanatory article says, “Why it’s gone viral four years after the play stopped running is anyone’s guess! The Internet is a strange place.” Thanks, Emily Lloyd!

August 16, 2016 at 9:46 am Leave a comment

Pokémon Go in libraries

 

pokeI’m not playing this [see below] and I don’t really understand how it works except that I hear Vernor Vinge’s Rainbows End has a similar kind of game in it it.

Apparently, Pokémon Go players are finding creatures and other stuff in libraries all over the United States. I wonder if I could lure one into my office? I will find out.

Pokémon GO: What Do Librarians Need To Know? (School Library Journal)

‘Pokémon Go’ sends swarms of players to bookstores and libraries. But will they remember the books? (Los Angeles Times)

Everything Librarians Need To Know About Pokemon Go! (Where We’re Going, We Don’t Need Shelves)

Why Pokemon Go and The Library is a perfect partnership (ALSC blog)

Local library goes viral thanks to Pokemon plans (The Island Packet)

Addendum, July 21: Change “I’m not playing this” to “I wish I could play this but my phone doesn’t have a gyroscope. My kids are playing it and so is practically everybody I know.”

A colleague was able to capture two creatures in the Special Collections area:

pokemon dante pokemon kinnee

 

July 14, 2016 at 10:25 am Leave a comment

library romance

bubbly-champagne-toastYour hardworking blogstress learned recently of a romantic library shenanigan at Tutt Library, Colorado College in the spring of 1988. Two students, hearing that a friend planned “an evening of study and courtship” at the library that evening, procured tuxedos, an ice bucket, champagne, and glasses; with white linen napkins over over one arm, they served the couple forthwith. According to my source, “there was some followup from then Librarian and classicist John Sheridan, who felt the need to be severe.”

May 20, 2016 at 3:50 pm Leave a comment

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