Posts filed under ‘perpetrated by animals’

Pokémon Go in libraries


pokeI’m not playing this [see below] and I don’t really understand how it works except that I hear Vernor Vinge’s Rainbows End has a similar kind of game in it it.

Apparently, Pokémon Go players are finding creatures and other stuff in libraries all over the United States. I wonder if I could lure one into my office? I will find out.

Pokémon GO: What Do Librarians Need To Know? (School Library Journal)

‘Pokémon Go’ sends swarms of players to bookstores and libraries. But will they remember the books? (Los Angeles Times)

Everything Librarians Need To Know About Pokemon Go! (Where We’re Going, We Don’t Need Shelves)

Why Pokemon Go and The Library is a perfect partnership (ALSC blog)

Local library goes viral thanks to Pokemon plans (The Island Packet)

Addendum, July 21: Change “I’m not playing this” to “I wish I could play this but my phone doesn’t have a gyroscope. My kids are playing it and so is practically everybody I know.”

A colleague was able to capture two creatures in the Special Collections area:

pokemon dante pokemon kinnee


July 14, 2016 at 10:25 am Leave a comment

dead mouse is not in database.

mouse7The Museum of English Rural Life (MERL) at the University of Reading found a dead mouse in its 155-year-old “perpetual mouse trap.” Rest in peace, little mouse. Your deed shall live forever in the records of the museum. Thanks, Lynne M. Thomas!

February 5, 2016 at 10:28 am Leave a comment

birds preserve documents

sfw_qcm_jwlprik.jpgBirds living in a cathedral in Zvenigorod, Russia accidentally preserved documents from the 1830s! ” ‘Swifts and jackdaws, which collected the documents to build nests, run their archives differently than people do,’ wrote Sedov [Dmitriy Sedov, research director of the Zvenigorod Historical and Architectural Museum] in a statement on the museum’s website. Instead of gathering up the most historically important documents and shelving them according to subject and chronology, the birds took whatever they could find. The result is an ‘incredibly diverse collection of fragments of human thoughts, feelings, experiences, concerns, passions and desires,’ he wrote, forming ‘a single giant discordant chorus’ of Zvenigorod life from 1830 through the early 1900s.”

It’s not often I get to use the category “perpetrated by animals,” so, thanks, Steve Lawson!

December 10, 2015 at 2:08 pm Leave a comment

kitty cat pulls prank on monks

catpawsSometime in the year 1445 (probably), a cat stepped in black ink and made paw prints in this Croatian manuscript. I wonder what the scribe (likely a monk) said when he (likely a he) found these marks. My guess is that it involved a few swear words. Thanks, Ross Gresham!

October 13, 2015 at 1:30 pm Leave a comment

check out this therapy dog — literally!

cooper The Countway Library of Harvard Medical School lends out a therapy dog named Cooper to those with the proper ID. From the library catalog record for Cooper: “1 dog (Shih Tzu) : dark brown, ash, and white hair, 15 lbs. ; 39 cm long. Notes: Should you have a good cry or even feign a whimper near Coop, you are guaranteed to get lots of kisses.”

catsMeanwhile, at the Kennedy Library of Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, cats are sometimes made available as a stressbusting treat.

Thanks, Joan Petit!

March 31, 2014 at 3:41 pm 1 comment

Russian library cat wears bow tie, is cute

enhanced-buzz-16370-1379440241-0As Ryan Broderick of Buzzfeed puts it: “Oh My God, There’s A Cat In Russia That Wears A Bow Tie And Works As A Librarian. The world is a beautiful place.”

Thanks, Kathleen Kirk (and others, but Kathleen was first).

September 19, 2013 at 12:58 pm 1 comment

museum shenanigans of the 1920s

Palmer animals prank 1929

Palmer animals prank 1922 a

Palmer animals prank 1922 b

Palmer animals prank 1922 c

Palmer animals prank 1922 d

Okay, so this isn’t precisely a library shenanigan, but it’s close enough, I think — people tend to elide museums and libraries.

On May 10, 1922, Colorado College students removed taxidermied animals from the college museum in Palmer Hall and placed them all over campus. This shenanigan was apparently in protest of then-president of the college, Clyde Duniway, whose policies were unpopular with students: he limited the times when men could visit women’s dormitories; strictly enforced chapel attendance; and fired a football coach for using profanity on the field. 350 students (about half the total enrollment) signed a petition complaining about Duniway, to no avail. The animals prank was one of several that spring: students also released hydrogen sulfide in one classroom building and somehow got a live cow up to the second floor of another.

In January of 1929, CC students again placed the museum animals around campus, this time to protest the firing of the editor of the student newspaper.

Source: J. Juan Reid, Colorado College: The First Century (1979), chapter V, “Controversy and Student Unrest.”

May 1, 2013 at 10:35 am Leave a comment

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