Posts filed under ‘books’

book cover quilts

The East Bank Regional branch of the Jefferson Parish Library in Metairie, Louisiana is currently displaying these excellent book cover quilts and more. All photos are by Laura Albana Hoffpauir.

June 5, 2017 at 1:41 pm Leave a comment

Mollat bookstore shenanigan

people-match-books-librairie-mollat-135-58bd718c9396a__700

The Librarie Mollat, a bookstore in Bordeaux, France, has been Instagramming images of their employees and customers with book covers. Some of them are so perfectly matched it seems unreal!

Thanks, Tom McBride and Bored Panda.

March 14, 2017 at 9:30 am 1 comment

the impact of a book

SONY DSCThis work of art by Jorge Méndez Blake has been shown in several galleries, and images of it are all over the web under the title “The Impact of a Book” and “L’impact d’un livre.” The artist’s title for the piece is Il Castillo / The Castle, after the title of the Kafka book at the bottom of the bricks.SONY DSC

Thanks, Emma Mitchell!

March 9, 2017 at 10:01 am Leave a comment

little goofs

amyfoamblocks

Sometimes the littlest library shenanigans are the best library shenanigans, like when your coworker makes you laugh by goofing around with the foam book supports,

dwydisml

 

or when your friend Nick Humez sends you a cartoon about the Dewey Decimal System.

January 16, 2017 at 4:59 pm Leave a comment

John Latham’s “Art and Culture”

latham
My colleague Diane Westerfield found a library shenanigan in a scholarly article!

“The Library in Art’s Crosshairs” by Henry Pisciotta. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, v. 35 no. 1, Spring 2016.
“British artist John Latham, while teaching at St. Martin’s School of Art in 1966, checked out a copy of Greenberg’s respected book [Art and Culture] from his school’s library and took it to an evening gathering of friends and students, where the book’s pages were removed and chewed, by a number of participants, and spat into a jar. Later Latham, keenly interested in science, performed a series of chemical transformations on the remains, slowly reducing them to a goo, which he sealed into a glass vial. Overdue notices were received from the library, so Latham eventually attempted to return the book to the librarian in its modified state. This offer was refused. Latham’s teaching contract was not renewed. A few years later, Latham fashioned a carrying case for the vial, some of the lab apparatus, and the library notices, and  today the assemblage is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art.”

The resulting artwork, titled, like the original book, “Art and Culture,” is not currently on view at MoMA, but you can see more information about it here.

October 6, 2016 at 1:52 pm Leave a comment

art made from digitized non-circulating books

Temple BarCraig Conley makes visual art from digitized “non-circulating” library books. As he explains in his artist’s statement:

Some library books, for a variety of reasons, become “non-circulating.”  … It’s a precious status, indicative of value, rarity, and refererence-worthiness.  Yet there’s a tinge of sadness, too — a hint of decrepitude and dormancy.  We asked a book-whisperer and learned that books do wish to circulate, to be worldly, to mingle, to be at large. …  Then, through a painstaking process involving collaged elements from non-circulating volumes of old magazines, we add some talisman-like flowing imagery to break the stagnation …

September 27, 2016 at 2:16 pm Leave a comment

incunabula joke

Glasgow Herald June 15 1939 page 10
Joke news from 1939. At left, Glasgow Herald,  June 15, 1939, page 10.

Similarly, the Library Association Record (London), Series 4, Volume 6, 1939, page 338:

“Then, too I should hope he had at least a nodding acquaintance with the technical jargon, or language if you prefer the term, of librarians and booksellers, so that if told that some incunabula had been found in one of the cupboards, he would not, as did one chairman, order the library to be closed and request the Medical Officer to have it immediately disinfected.”

Thank you, Daniel Traister, for bringing this shenanigan to my attention on Facebook with an image from an unknown publication:

incunabula

And thank you, Jay Dillon, for providing the versions with citations.

Traister’s Facebook friends then proceeded to yuck it up:

Peter Donaldson: Little things fit for a cradle? I can see lots of health issues!

Jack Lynch: That can give you a bad case of rubrication.

Merrily Taylor: Well, if the darned things proliferate, you find yourself with all these Rare Book Librarians to mind them, and you know how demanding THEY are!

Jay Dillon: What *other* incunable jokes are there? (My own modest contribution to the subsubgenre, some years ago, was to suggest that incunabulists might be called ‘fifteenyboppers’.

Camilo Marquez: I had some grilled with olive oil, oregano and crumbled feta at my favorite Mediterranean spot.

 

 

August 4, 2016 at 11:33 am 2 comments

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